How Russian Culture and Media Shape Belarusian Politics
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W. R.
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How Russian Culture and Media Shape Belarusian Politics
Quote:How Russian Culture and Media Shape Belarusian Politics

Ryhor Astapenia
06 February 2014


On 31 January the director of the National Book Chamber of Belarus claimed that the Belarusian publishers printed eight times more books in Russian than in Belarusian in 2013. This data illustrates well the position that Russian culture occupies in Belarus.

The Russian language dominates the cultural and media space. Belarusians prefer to surf Russian websites like mail.ru and to watch Russian TV series like The Real Guys more than their Belarusian or Western equivalents. <...>

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Some quotations:

‘Russian cultures' dominance hampers Belarusian nation-building, a process that further inhibits the nation's democratisation. To promote the development of Belarusian society the West could support Belarusian culture, media, and scholarship more than it does at present.’

Actually this makes perfect sense. Nationalism goes before democracy. The EU and the USA should not support democratic activists here financially, that's a waste of money anyway. They should give money to nationalists instead. Or to support Belarusian cultural initiatives at least.

‘Belarusians do not trust their own domestic public media, yet still have faith in Russia's own offering. As a result, Belarusians often share a Russian propagandistic point of view on the events such as Euromaidan in Ukraine or the Russian invasion of Georgia.’

True.

‘Belarusians' addiction to Russian culture and media is in large part responsible for the nation's political dependence on Russia and the geopolitical situation in Belarus.’

No comment.

‘It is also no secret that Russian and Soviet historians have been working against their Belarusian counterparts. Given the sheer size and volume of their output, it should not be much a surprise that they are winning. Even the names of Belarusian streets often carry Russian names, and statues of Lenin still stand stall in nearly every city in Belarus.’

True.

‘Today, the West can assign more resources to the development of Belarusian-language media, scholarship and culture. It is precisely for this reason that projects contributing to the development of the Belarusian language should be a priority for western policymakers.

The process of democratisation in Belarus means much more than developing a political consciousness among its citizenry . In many ways it is also a question of civilising the country. In order to better contribute to the promotion of democracy in Belarus, the West can support more cultural events like Language or Coffee (Mova ci kava) or educational projects aimed not only at pro-democratic Belarusians, but all segments of society.’


No comment.

It seems to be the right thread to mention that one of the main motivations for me to start studying English was the wish to break out of the Russian cultural sphere. That awkward feeling when your nationalism makes you learn foreign languages. LOL

There are many ways to undermine the Russian cultural domination. Why not let a couple of Ukrainian channels broadcast in Belarus? The Ukrainian and Belarusian languages are similar, and Ukrainian media products are of the same quality or even better than Russian ones. But ZALA package, offered by monopolist 'Beltelecom' does not include a single Ukrainian channel. Looks like our chieftains are so afraid of any winds of changes, that they see the tamed Russian media as the only media that can be entrusted the right to brainwash Belarusians.

[...] just as it is not left unto us to choose our ancestors, so we may not choose our nation; we can only fulfil, or not fulfil, the obligations that come from being a member of our people’.
© Dr. Jan Stankievič ‘From the History of Belarus’

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2014 Feb 09 07:18
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Mustapaita
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RE: How Russian Culture and Media Shape Belarusian Politics
Quote:The Russian language dominates the cultural and media space. Belarusians prefer to surf Russian websites like mail.ru and to watch Russian TV series like The Real Guys more than their Belarusian or Western equivalents.

No. 2: The Vampire Diaries. Big Grin

Interesting ideas, though. May be you should get in touch with Mrs. Nuland? ;)

"Devil, I am devil." ― Pekka Siitoin
2014 Feb 09 07:59
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W. R.
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RE: How Russian Culture and Media Shape Belarusian Politics
(2014 Feb 09 07:59)Mustapaita Wrote:  No. 2: The Vampire Diaries. Big Grin

Sufficient proof that the attempt to break out of the Russian cultural sphere was successful: I had to google it. Tongue

(2014 Feb 09 07:59)Mustapaita Wrote:  Interesting ideas, though. May be you should get in touch with Mrs. Nuland? ;)

Western politicians have many educated consultants at their disposal. I can't believe nobody has ever proposed the obvious idea. But Western politicians tend to be afraid of nationalism, and to believe in 'pure democracy/liberalism', denying the reality. As long as they do it, Luka can rest. Nationalism provides cohesion and makes a nation act like a subject. The Belarusian society seems to be very atomized now. Which is good for the stability of the authoritarian regime. For the future of the nation - not so much.

[...] just as it is not left unto us to choose our ancestors, so we may not choose our nation; we can only fulfil, or not fulfil, the obligations that come from being a member of our people’.
© Dr. Jan Stankievič ‘From the History of Belarus’

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2014 Feb 09 08:19
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RE: How Russian Culture and Media Shape Belarusian Politics
Quote:The Crimean catalyst. Back in the USSR

10.03.2014, 15:09, Andrzhei Pochobut

The unprecedented campaign of lies and hate, that is being waged by “First Channel”, RTR and NTV, is ricocheting at Belarus as well.

«There are no Ukrainians, there are Malorusses», «Ukraine is in many respects an artificial formation», «The Ukrainian army has long since been ridiculed», «Shevchenko is a second-class poet». One would guess, such anti-Ukrainian propaganda must cause rejection among Belarusians. Because its context is clear, one doesn't have to have especially vivid imagination to imagine the word “a Ukrainian” being replaced by the word “a Belarusian”.

People, who perceive themselves as citizens of the independent state of the Republic of Belarus, don't embrace such propaganda. But are all holders of blue passports of the Republic of Belarus such people?

The Russian aggression in the Crimea has divided the Belarusian society. It's difficult to talk about the ratio, but the fact itself is obvious: a significant part of Belarusians support what Russia is doing.

Of course one can blame the Russian “zombie box”. The unprecedented campaign of lies and hate, that is being waged by “First Channel”, RTR and NTV, is ricocheting at Belarus as well. We are still stewing in the Russian informational field, where one is supposed to consume Russian news and then embrace the Russian view of the world.

But it is not only about the Muscovite “zombie box”.

The Soviet Union has not existed for 23 years, and the Soviet man is still alive. In Belarus by efforts of Alexander Lukashenka he feels better than anywhere else. 7th November is still a holiday, Vladimir Lenin is still standing on central squares, the red and green flag of the BSSR is still hovering over the country, and the TV year by year exposes perfidious plans by the perfidious West...

In one word — a Soviet reservation!

And for the Soviet man Moscow is “the capital of our motherland”, the Russian language is “native”, Pushkin is “our poet”, Russian are “ours”, and correspondingly the independence of Belarus (as well as the independence of Ukraine) is only temporary mistake, intrigues by Bendera's henchmen

Until recently it has been believed that the “sovok” was dying. And the mentioned above rudiments were just manifestations of its unconscious and decreasing activity. Mortal agony... But once Moscow stroke its military drum, the “sovok” revived, began to move, became noticeable in streets and in public places.

The mass support for Russia displayed by citizens of the RB is a bad message for people, who connect their future with Belarus. But not only for them. It is a bad message for Alexander Lukashenka as well. Because this time he didn't give the order to support “Mother Russia”. And despite that the mass support for the Kremiln is obvious.

And this means that such an order can be given by somebody else in an appropriate moment. And it would not be far to the sacramental words “you reap what you sow.” You wanted integration? Here you are!

And (as comrades Lennon and McCartney sung) back in the USSR!

HERE

[...] just as it is not left unto us to choose our ancestors, so we may not choose our nation; we can only fulfil, or not fulfil, the obligations that come from being a member of our people’.
© Dr. Jan Stankievič ‘From the History of Belarus’

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2014 Mar 12 16:22
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RE: How Russian Culture and Media Shape Belarusian Politics
Next thing you know - Putin will say ethnic Russians in Belarus are at risk from the Minsk junta. Hmm...

Quote:Pro-Russian Groups Become More Active In Belarus

On 9 November 2014 in Pastavy - a city in the Vitebsk Region of Belarus – members of the Holy Rus' Movement distributed flyers with a call for the unification of the 'Russian World'. Many similar events and military camps now taking place for Belarusian youth near Minsk and Vitebsk and exhibit a rather disturbing trend.

At camps organised by organisations such as Kazachi Spas or The Orthodox Brotherhood, soldiers and veterans instruct Belarusian youth and teenagers about the tactics employed by sabotage groups and how to handle weapons and survive. The Ukrainian 2014 revolution and subsequent events clearly triggered pro-Russian centres and groups to activate themselves.

Development of Ideological and Religious Centres

Kazachi Spas and The Orthodox Brotherhood promote themselves in Belarusian media as anti-globalisation, traditional and orthodox communities. They also pay a great deal of attention to religious and pro-Russian ideological aspects. In order to be able to work effectively, these radical organisations need support from the authorities in Belarus.

Opened in June 2014 the Centre of Russian Culture and Science in Brest became the first official regional pro-Russian headquarter in Belarus founded by Rossotrudnichestvo. According to the founders of the centre, institutions like theirs launched their projects around the world as a result of a personal order from none other than Vladimir Putin himself.

Trying to maintain Russia's influence in the CIS, Putin increased the budget of Rossotrudnichestvo nearly four times in 2014 - up to $300m. Rossotrudnichestvo is a federal agency in charge of maintaining Russia's influence abroad. Besides its new headquarters, Rossotrudnichestvo finances Rus Molodaya - an ultra-right movement with branch offices in Belarus. Closely linked to the ultra-nationalist paramilitary group Russian National Unity, Rus Molodaya also aims to establish a “New Russian World”.

photo: kazak.byOther Russian NGOs have become more visible too. Members of the Russian Public Movement for the Spiritual Development of the People for the State and Spiritual Revival of Holy Rus' (Holy Rus') also became active in Belarus in 2014. Registered in Russia, this NGO has basically transformed into a cult of pro-Russian ideology. It works on spiritual development and unity of citizens of all nationalities living in Russia and has several offices in Belarus.

The more recent activity of Holy Rus' in Belarus includes several other gatherings including, for example, in Maladzyechna near Minsk or a November 2014 meeting in Vitebsk. According to the Holy Rus’s web site they are also distributing leaflets at holidays in several locales like Homel, Vitebsk and Postavy. According to these leaflets, Belarus and Ukraine should become part of an indivisible Holy Rus' and unite with Russia in the future.

...and Even More Radical Organisations

Some other radical organisations have sprung up in 2014 as well, including the Military-Patriotic Orthodox Brotherhood named after he Holy Prince Boris and Gleb Tolochinsky (the Brotherhood) and paramilitary patriotic Cossack club Kazachi Spas. Oleg Plaksitsky, the Leader of the Brotherhood, is also an Orthodox priest in Belarusian town Drutsk. Members of the Brotherhood like to parade the symbols of the Ukrainian separatists. As Plaksitsky insists, as symbols that denote their anti-fascist principles.

On his web site ​Plaksitsky justifies young people participating in military training by saying they need to be ready to fight neo-fascism. He also states that Ukraine has become closely linked to fascism, and refers to the Ukrainians’ participation in punitive operations on the territory of modern day Belarus during World War II as proof.

Since 2013, Plaksitsky has organised camps in cooperation with military base number 71325 of the Ministry of Defence of Belarus in the village of Zaslonava near Minsk. This year at the patriotic summer camps near Minsk instructors taught youth mountaineering, how to handle an automatic weapon and how to find your way in and survive in a forest. The priest also taught the youth about the values of the Orthodox Church and its role in Russian culture.

Open Passage Provided by the Belarusian Authorities

The much more developed and influential group Kazachi Spas has been working in Belarus since February 2010. From the beginning Kazachi Spas co-operated with the Belarusian Ministry of Defence, Cossack organisations from all over the former Soviet Union and with the 45th Detached Reconnaissance Regiment located in Russia. Interestingly, the 45th Detached Reconnaissance Regiment took part in the First and the Second Chechen wars, the Georgian-Ossetian conflict and the Georgian-Abkhaz conflict.

Cooperation with the Belarusian authorities is a clear indication about the real level of support for pro-Russian paramilitary organisations inside the country. From time to time the Belarusian Ministry of Defence lets Kazachi Spas visit and train at Belarusian military bases. The 45th Detached Reconnaissance Regiment, the Russian Union of Veterans of the intelligence and security services provide instructors and training materials.

Teaching About Russia and The Orthodox Church

For its younger participants, Kazachi Spas organises trips to various camps in several countries of the former USSR. Kazachi Spas presents its work to parents as a kind of recreational summer camp. Similar Cossack organisations also thrive in Kyrgyzstan, Kazakhstan, Armenia and Moldova. Military training camps for youth were already functioning in Crimea back in 2004. After the annexation of Crimea, the camp has continued its work but now with Russian instructors.

According to the Spas web site nearly 150 youth between 8 and 17 years old participated in its camps in 2014. The youth read about Soviet and Russian history and the role of the Orthodox Church in Belarus. Ideological work in the camps includes making presentations on Belarus and Ukraine as historical parts of the 'Russian World'.

According to the web site of Kazachi Spas “youth should actively train and know how to handle weapons in order to defend Belarus and prevent a Ukrainian scenario in the future”. Without further details about whom the youth should defend Belarus from, such statement are controversial.

In the past only a few organisations like the ultra-nationalist paramilitary group Russian National Unity carried out any kind of openly pro-Russian activity in Belarus. Nowadays organisations also lean heavily on religious and ideological indoctrination. Cossack movements have proven their efficacy in Ukraine. Their members were among the first separatists in Crimea, Lugansk and Donetsk.

A Real Threat to Belarusian Independence?

The 2015 Presidential Elections in Belarus and the Ukrainian Maidan revolution in 2014 launched a new wave activity by pro-Russian organisations. And it seems that the Belarusian authorities are not doing much to prevent these groups from carrying out their work. Perhaps the authorities hope that the paramilitary groups inside the country will prove to be an additional force against the opposition for the Belarusian regime. However, a more important question is whether or not Lukashenka can actually control them.

Lukashenka tries to reduce his dependency on Russia to maintain his post. But he cannot openly confront Russia due to Russia's economic and political support. At the moment, both Belarusian civil society and the authorities are in the same boat and should think about how they might be able to prevent Ukraine-style destabilisation efforts by pro-Russian paramilitary groups in Belarus.

Strengthening Belarusian national and civic identity as well as carrying out information campaigns about the threat of full dependency on Russia can play an important role in preventing a similarly violent scenario from taking place in Belarus.
http://belarusdigest.com/story/pro-russi...arus-20470
2014 Dec 30 12:42
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RE: How Russian Culture and Media Shape Belarusian Politics
(2014 Mar 12 16:22)W. R. Wrote:  «There are no Ukrainians, there are Malorusses», «Ukraine is in many respects an artificial formation», «The Ukrainian army has long since been ridiculed», «Shevchenko is a second-class poet»

But that's all true (except I don't know much about Shevchenko). And I don't even watch TV. dunno

Also I like this:

> The unprecedented campaign of lies and hate hurr durr
> Muscovite “zombie box”

Such lexic makes it quite easy to pinpoint what kind of author we have here. Also, is that just one of your translations W.R., or did they really use the word "sovok" in an English language article? Can't wait for the international audience becoming more familiar with other such slang, as "vata", "manyamirok", "nedorossiya", "liberast" etc.. LOL

"Whoever says that he "belongs to his time" is only saying that he agrees with the largest number of fools at that moment." - Nicolás Gómez Dávila

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2014 Dec 30 13:16
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RE: How Russian Culture and Media Shape Belarusian Politics
(2014 Dec 30 13:16)Temnozor Wrote:  Such lexic makes it quite easy to pinpoint what kind of author we have here. Also, is that just one of your translations W.R., or did they really use the word "sovok" in an English language article? Can't wait for the international audience becoming more familiar with other such slang, as "vata", "manyamirok", "nedorossiya", "liberast" etc.. LOL
I've seen it, Tovarishch moi, I've seen it! Big Grin Posmotri:
http://observer.com/2014/12/russians-rag...t-america/

Quote:Russians Rage Against America

Enduring Sanctions, Anger Turns to Hate: Racist Names for Obama and Putin Disses Coca-Cola


By Mikhail Klikushin | 12/29/14 1:17pm

ST. PETERSBURG—Relations between Russia and the US have sunk to new lows. President Putin, shown here hosting President Obama last September, has even expressed his disdain for Coca-Cola. (Photo by Ramil Sitdikov/Host Photo Agency via Getty Images)

If you talk to a Russian about the international political situation, sooner or later you will be informed that there is a country in North America that you’ve never heard of. Its name is ‘Pindosia,’ ‘Pindostan’ or, more officially, ‘United States of Pindostan,’ and you will be told that one part of it, called Alaska, used to belong to Russia. Part of the word—‘stan’—stands for underdeveloped state, as in ‘ Pakistan,’ ‘Kazakhstan,’ or ‘Uzbekistan.’ The citizens of this country in plural form are called ‘pindoses,’ in singular—‘pindos.’

There are more than 316 million ‘pindoses’ in ‘Pindostan.’

Today, this country has a black President, and the Russians have a nickname for him too. He is called Maximka—after a character from a popular Soviet movie, made in 1952, which told the story of a black boy saved by the Russian sailors from the cruelty of the vicious American slave-traders who were terribly abusing him and calling him just that—“Boy.” In the film, the saved boy was fed well by the Russian crew, given the name Maximka, and became one of their own in the end.

But by the modern-day Russian legend, Maximka, unfortunately, has grown up into an ungrateful Russophobe.

One can assume that the reader by now has a clue what this country is.

The word ‘pindos’ in Russian is highly offensive, and defines a helpless creature that is a product of a very bad educational system, one who can survive in this world only with the help of various gadgets. The origin of the word is unknown, and the philologists are fighting to establish it. The most popular explanation states that this word was invented by Russian peacekeepers in Serbia with the purpose of describing a NATO soldier, who was seen by them as a strange, clumsy figure with his 90 lbs. of bulletproof vest, weapons, radios, flashlights and so on.

Russians have taken to calling President Obama "Maximka" after a character from a popular 1952 Soviet movie, which depicted a black boy saved by Russian sailors.
Russians have taken to calling President Obama “Maximka” after a character from a popular 1952 Soviet movie, which depicted a black boy saved by Russian sailors.

From afar, he looked very strange to the Russian eye—like a penguin.

The Russians have had their favorite, most-hated pindoses. One of them, the constant laughingstock in the media, used to be the US Ambassador to Moscow, Michael McFaul. He was a huge fan of Twitter and if judged by the number of his tweets, spent more time on his gadget than actually doing his job. After more than two years of service there, upon his departure, he received only two words in Russian—via Twitter—from the Russian Ministry for Foreign Affairs: “Goodbye Mikhail.”

Today his place has been taken by the spokesperson for the US Department of State, Jen Psaki. She has an anti-fan club of haters who consider her not to be very bright—they even invented their own anti-IQ unit called 1 Psaki. One who has 3 Psakis has a brain of a clam. The term ‘psaking’ in Russian political newspeak means to know nothing about the subject while saying something banal and politically correct. She is so popular that when she injured her foot and came in front of the cameras with the cast on, all major Russian TV channels and newspapers reported the event.

Another hated ‘pindos’ is Senator John McCain (R-Ariz.), famous in Russia for his periodic tweets to ‘Dear Vlad.’ In 2011, for example, Mr. McCain tweeted Putin, “Dear Vlad, The #ArabSpring is coming to a neighborhood near you.” Usually reserved and purposefully polite while talking about his ‘partners from over the Big Pool’ (Big Pool being the Atlantic Ocean ), this time Mr. Putin shot back, saying that Mr. McCain “has a lot of blood of peaceful civilians on his hands. He must relish and can’t live without the disgusting, repulsive scenes of the killing of Gadhafi.” “Mr. McCain was captured in Vietnam and they kept him not just in prison, but in a pit for several years,” Mr. Putin added. “Anyone [in his place] would have had his roof moved over.” The last three words in Russian slang mean “suddenly to become insane.”

Today, according to the respected Moscow ‘Levada Center,’ which measures political sentiment in Russian society, 74% of Russians have negative feelings towards the USA. It hasn’t always been like this; in the 1990s, 80% had positive attitude toward America.

Currently, 76% of Russians hate Obama personally and only a meager 2% like him. In 2009 only 12% of Russians had extremely negative feelings towards Obama.

These are the maximum peaks of anti-American feelings in Russia in years but the sociologists believe they could go even higher in the near future.

Anti-American sentiment has been growing slowly in Russia since the war in former Yugoslavia. But the sharp recent increase happened as a result of the US-led sanctions that were imposed on Russia after the ‘Russian annexation of Crimea.’ For example, just last week Visa and MasterCard completely stopped their operations in Crimea, leaving more than 2 million people there without access to their money. 75% of Russians do not believe that their country is responsible for the events in Ukraine. On the contrary, they blame the US.

When the sanctions began, many Russian businesses responded by putting up ‘Obama Is Sanctioned Here’ signs on their doors and windows.

However today they went much farther.

The owners of the Moscow supermarket “Electronics on Presnya” are using American flag doormats so the customers could wipe their dirty feet off, according to the British tabloid Daily Mail. “Customers have been filmed wiping their feet on the fabled stars and stripes as they enter and exit stores across Moscow, as struggling retailers take a hopeless swipe at their Cold War adversaries,” reports the newspaper. According to the Moskovky Komsomolets Moscow newspaper, the nation’s business owners decided to put the US flag under the Russians’ feet because of the strained relations between the two countries. “New doormats with the American flag were put at every exit so that America would not think that she is allowed to everything,” they say. “From one perspective, of course it is a flag, but from the other, because of this entire situation in the world, regular folks are suffering. All the electronics we import, mostly from China and buy for dollars. We have to work directly so the US would have no chance to manipulate the prices.” (The Russian ruble lost about 50% of its value because of the economic sanctions by the western countries and a fall in the oil price.)

By the words of the shopping center’s attorney Konstantin Trapaidze, the doormats with the American flag do not break any Russian law. “It is very probable that the doormats have a decorative character. Yes, people are walking on them but nobody prohibited this. They produce not only doormats with the flag on them but also furniture upholstery. The breaking of the law would be when someone would start burning such a doormat or real flag demonstratively, or tear it up.”

Major Russian TV channel Vesti eagerly reported that fact. They also added that some Moscow stores were selling the toilet paper with American flag imprinted on it. The pricetag was $1 per roll.

A number of Russian politicians have been working very hard to keep the flames of rage burning. Last week, the Speaker of the Russian Parliament, Sergei Naryshkin, raised the issue of starting an international investigation of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombings by the US in 1945, as a ‘crime against humanity’ has no time limit. He wanted nothing less than a new Nuremberg trial with the US at the criminal’s bench.

Vladimir Putin, from his side, during his most recent press conference, used the occasion to show his negative attitude toward one of America ’s most popular products. Answering a question about Russian drink Kvass, he said, “I don’t know how harmful Coca-Cola is, but a lot of specialists say that it is, especially for children. I don’t want to offend Coca-Cola, but we have our own national non-alcoholic beverages, and we shall help them to win our stores’ shelves.”

He could have chosen another brand as an example of an unhealthy soda, since there is no shortage of different drinks in Russia’s stores. But to no one’s surprise, the Russian President chose for his attack the very symbol of Pindostan.

[Image: screen-shot-2014-12-29-at-12-44-46-pm.pn...;amp;h=307] thumbs up
Russian newspapers are giddily depicting the new trend of “American flag floormats” seen at Russian businesses. (screencap: politobzor.net/)

Read more at http://observer.com/2014/12/russians-rag...z3NOJFdUMF
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As well as Pindusy (and I'm disappointed they didn't discuss the Pontiitsy Greek connection, from an etymological and cultural-linguistics point of view PERKELE ), I've seen vatniki around too! What's that about, though, this 'vata' thing? 'Cotton wool' as something fluffy and pointless, which almost shares a syllable with soVETsky?!

* * *

As for the thread topic (sometimes I pay attention to these things!), this is the larger question of how nationalism can be squared with the fact that ethnicity is not quite a matter of black/white abrupt divisions between peoples. Just as languages flow into each other around the edges, so too do peoples form wider families and regional groups. The options facing the nationalist are to be realistic about this, and account for wider categories, or to be dogmatic and attempt to change reality, Jacobin-style, i.e. stamp the shit out of your peripheries to make them more resemble your chosen 'central' or 'metropolitan' variety (in speech and identity), and force them into forgetting older connections with people who are often geographically and culturally closer to them than their 'fellow countrymen' in the capital. This often involves absurd lies and twisting of history. Those responsible are fully cognisant of this, but feel it's 'worthwhile' in order to construct some kind of distinct sovereignty.

Aside from general distaste for dishonesty, particularly in historical matters, the rather dubious nature of 'sovereignty' in the modern era calls this approach into question, I reckon.

"And now if a whole nation fell into that? In such a case, I answer, infallibly they will return out of it. For life is no cunningly-devised deception or self deception, it is a great truth that thou art alive, that thou hast desires, necessities: neither can these subsist and satisfy themselves on delusions, but on fact. To fact, depend on it, we shall come back: to such fact, blessed or cursed, as we have wisdom for."
Thomas Carlyle
(This post was last modified: 2014 Dec 30 22:30 by Osweo.)
2014 Dec 30 15:32
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RE: How Russian Culture and Media Shape Belarusian Politics
(2014 Dec 30 15:32)Osweo Wrote:  I've seen vatniki around too! What's that about, though, this 'vata' thing? 'Cotton wool' as something fluffy and pointless, which almost shares a syllable with soVETsky?!

Nah, it's a Russian meme originating from VK. It was later picked up by Russian imageboards too and now it's very mainstream (particularly in Ukraine). Basically, it's supposed to portray a jingoistic Russian (and a "vatnik", originally, is a woolen jacket most prominently worn by Gulag inmates). Vatnik is known for blaming the West for wanting to destroy his holy Russia (while he lives in shit), seeing a zhidoreptiloid (Jew reptilians) conspiracy behind everything and nakatyvat' za dedov (drink the health of our grandfathers). It doesn't go further than simple internet trolling of "patriots versus liberals", but if you want to read more into it, vatnik is an evolved Homo Sovieticus. Tongue

Here some samples:

[Image: jvmsangx.jpg]

[Image: 2xizv2sd.jpg]

[Image: ykktzuqa.jpg]

[Image: earkyvs3.jpg]

[Image: scd5wmdd.gif]

For more info:
https://lurkmore.to/%C2%E0%F2%ED%E8%EA
Big Grin

"Whoever says that he "belongs to his time" is only saying that he agrees with the largest number of fools at that moment." - Nicolás Gómez Dávila

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(This post was last modified: 2014 Dec 30 22:09 by Temnozor.)
2014 Dec 30 19:35
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W. R.
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cannibalish chauvinist



Беларусь

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Post: #9
RE: How Russian Culture and Media Shape Belarusian Politics
(2014 Dec 30 13:16)Temnozor Wrote:  > Muscovite “zombie box”

Such lexic makes it quite easy to pinpoint what kind of author we have here. Also, is that just one of your translations W.R., or did they really use the word "sovok" in an English language article?

'Muscovite' was 'московский' originally. I translated the article from Russian.

(2014 Dec 30 19:35)Temnozor Wrote:  zhidoreptiloid (Jew reptilians) conspiracy behind everything

Among other things they force vodka down vatniks' throats.

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But they are resisted!

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[...] just as it is not left unto us to choose our ancestors, so we may not choose our nation; we can only fulfil, or not fulfil, the obligations that come from being a member of our people’.
© Dr. Jan Stankievič ‘From the History of Belarus’

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2014 Dec 31 14:05
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Phlegethon
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Factionist of the forlorn



Deutschland

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Post: #10
RE: How Russian Culture and Media Shape Belarusian Politics
Liberast has also made it into the German journalists' vocabulary by now.


Not in haunts of marble chill,
Temples drear where ancients trod,—
Nay, in oaks on woody hill
Lives and moves the German God.

2014 Dec 31 19:58
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