Slavthread
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Mylene
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Post: #31
RE: Slavthread
(2015 Jan 04 00:50)Temnozor Wrote:  Yeah, that's correct. Congratulation on your Slav powers. LOL

Well, that's the meaning in Serbian. Big Grin

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2015 Jan 04 01:15
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Post: #32
RE: Slavthread
(2015 Jan 04 01:15)Mylene Wrote:  Well, that's the meaning in Serbian. Big Grin

Ah, wait, "pain" can not be a synonym for illness here?

"Whoever says that he "belongs to his time" is only saying that he agrees with the largest number of fools at that moment." - Nicolás Gómez Dávila

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2015 Jan 04 01:17
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Post: #33
RE: Slavthread
(2015 Jan 04 01:11)Temnozor Wrote:  
(2015 Jan 04 00:58)Aramis Wrote:  Pravit pravu pravdu!

Make the truth true?.

Build true justice Big Grin


Quote:But that's missing the "very", wtf. You couldn't put a "very" into the equivalent of your first sentence in Russian as well "ja ne ćuvstvuju sebja horošo", but to add a "very" you just need to say "ja ćuvstvuju sebja oćen' ploho". But that doesn't even contain "ill", just "feel not good / feel (very) bad". Just what the fuck is wrong with your language!

(2015 Jan 04 00:58)Aramis Wrote:  Ja sam jako bolestan - I am very sick.

That's more like it, but I was looking for the unfinished form. "I fell very sick", "I got very sick", "I became very sick".

Ploho = Plaho. Didn't know the origin of that word. Now I now its slavic.

But sick is not being ill in my understanding (as far as English goes). If you are interested how to phrase "I feel very ill", these are some possibilities I'd use:

- Ne osjećam se nimalo dobro
- Nije mi nimalo dobro.
- Nisam nimalo dobro.
- Pravo mi je pozlilo
- Mnogo mi je zlo
- Osjećam se pravo loše.
- Osjećam se dosta loše.

etc.

Samo kurvi i konobaru pare ostavljam.
2015 Jan 04 01:22
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Mylene
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Post: #34
RE: Slavthread
(2015 Jan 04 01:17)Temnozor Wrote:  Ah, wait, "pain" can not be a synonym for illness here?

Pain- bol
Illness- bolest
Ill- bolestan, bolesna, bolesno
Painful-bolan, bolna, bolno

So, the rut is the same, but there are some differences.

coffee
2015 Jan 04 01:22
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Post: #35
RE: Slavthread
(2015 Jan 04 01:22)Aramis Wrote:  Build true justice Big Big Grin

PRAVDA MEANS JUSTICE!?! speechless

(2015 Jan 04 01:22)Aramis Wrote:  Ploho = Plaho. Didn't know the origin of that word. Now I now its slavic.

Does it mean "bad" in Croatian as well? Synonym of "loše", then?

(2015 Jan 04 01:22)Aramis Wrote:  If you are interested how to phrase "I feel very ill", these are some possibilities I'd use:

- Ne osjećam se nimalo dobro
- Nije mi nimalo dobro.
- Nisam nimalo dobro.
- Pravo mi je pozlilo
- Mnogo mi je zlo
- Osjećam se pravo loše.
- Osjećam se dosta loše.

etc.

These are all very, very weird. Oćen', oćen strjomno. dunno

(2015 Jan 04 01:22)Mylene Wrote:  Pain- bol
Illness- bolest
Ill- bolestan, bolesna, bolesno
Painful-bolan, bolna, bolno

So, the rut is the same, but there are some differences.

Yeah, ah okay. Pretty close to Russian:

Pain: bol'
Illness: bolezn'
Ill: bolnoj, bolnaja, bolnoje
Painful: bolnyj, bolnaja, bolnoje

"Whoever says that he "belongs to his time" is only saying that he agrees with the largest number of fools at that moment." - Nicolás Gómez Dávila

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2015 Jan 04 01:37
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Post: #36
RE: Slavthread
(2015 Jan 04 01:37)Temnozor Wrote:  
(2015 Jan 04 01:22)Aramis Wrote:  Build true justice Big Big Grin

PRAVDA MEANS JUSTICE!?! speechless

I believe it's the only meaning, yes.

https://www.facebook.com/pzvtm?fref=ts

(2015 Jan 04 01:22)Aramis Wrote:  Does it mean "bad" in Croatian as well? Synonym of "loše", then?

It's actually a superlative, similar to "mnogo", and used most often in a positive context.

"Ja plaho volim jabuke". "Ona je plaho lijepa". "Ona je plaha".

Or... "On je plaho zao".

Samo kurvi i konobaru pare ostavljam.
2015 Jan 04 01:49
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Post: #37
RE: Slavthread
(2015 Jan 04 01:49)Aramis Wrote:  It's actually a superlative, similar to "mnogo", and used most often in a positive context.

"Ja plaho volim jabuke". "Ona je plaho lijepa". "Ona je plaha".

Or... "On je plaho zao".

This is interesting, we never use this word in this meaning in Serbian. Hmm... This is also new information for me.

In Serbian, there are adjectives plah and plahovit and adverb plaho.

plah-the one who is easily upset, who get easily excited, who react too fast, intense, severe
plaho- wildly, fast, fiercely
plahovit-could be synonym for plah, if we talk about person; fiery, etc...

Actually, here is something from dictionary (although Cyrillic script and many won't understand).
[Image: 36879_58551665_PLAH.jpg]

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2015 Jan 04 02:14
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Post: #38
RE: Slavthread
(2015 Jan 04 01:49)Aramis Wrote:  
(2015 Jan 04 01:22)Aramis Wrote:  Does it mean "bad" in Croatian as well? Synonym of "loše", then?

It's actually a superlative, similar to "mnogo", and used most often in a positive context.

"Ja plaho volim jabuke". "Ona je plaho lijepa". "Ona je plaha".

Or... "On je plaho zao".

AFAIK, 'plah' is just 'timid' in Croatian. Hmm...

plȃh

plȃh prid. 〈odr. -ī〉


1. koji se svega boji, koji na sve trza, koji je bojažljiv, plahovit [plaha ptica]
2. arh. jez. knjiž. žestok, nagao, neobuzdan [plah konj]

✧ prasl. *polxъ, *ploxъ (rus. ploxój: loš, polj. płochy: plah)

http://hjp.novi-liber.hr

We must dissent.

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2015 Jan 04 12:42
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Post: #39
RE: Slavthread
Still doesn't match with the Russian word.

And on second consideration I believe the word itself is Turkish in origin. Doesn't sound Slavic to begin with.

Plaho is definitely a turcism bearing in BiH the one meaning I elaborated in my previous post.

http://vukajlija.com/plaho/173920

Now, as for plah and plahovit, I am aware of the meaning given by Dussander and Mylene, but can't make it out how these differences came into existence.

Also, I found this...

http://europski-dom-sb.hr/wp-content/upl...United.pdf

... in which "plaho" is presented as synonymous with good and fine in Croatian. Which in turn derived form the Turkish word "ürkekçe"? (Google translate translates "ürkekçe" as "bojažljivo").


Long story short: dunno


EDIT: Interesting dictionary nonetheless. Some words seem out of place, but the vast majority makes sense. Didn't know there was still such a number of Turkish loanwords present on the Balkan.

And it warms my heart that both "četa" as in "četnik" and "delija" are Turkish words Big Grin

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2015 Jan 04 13:38
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Post: #40
RE: Slavthread
(2015 Jan 04 13:38)Aramis Wrote:  EDIT: Interesting dictionary nonetheless. Some words seem out of place, but the vast majority makes sense. Didn't know there was still such a number of Turkish loanwords present on the Balkan.

And it warms my heart that both "četa" as in "četnik" and "delija" are Turkish words Big Grin

I stumbled upon a very disturbing Turkish loanword in your Balkan tongues. I was very disappointed to learn that you have no proper Slavic word for "enemy" and really use "dušmani" - that's just shamefure! Russians referred in that way only to their enemies in Afghanistan and later Chechnya, making the nickname "duhi" (I'd translate it as "ghosts", but actually it's "spirits") out of it for them. That's a most disgusting durka durka word! PERKELE

(Never mind, though, our Russian word for "money" is of Finnish Mongol origin PERKELE )

"Whoever says that he "belongs to his time" is only saying that he agrees with the largest number of fools at that moment." - Nicolás Gómez Dávila

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2015 Jan 04 17:31
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