Trump the Disrupter
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Blackthorne
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Post: #81
RE: Trump the Disrupter
'Putin praises 'bright and talented' Trump'

Donald Trump has said that he would "get along very well" with Russian President Vladimir Putin.

Apparently, the feeling is mutual.

Putin offered high praise for the billionaire businessman turned Republican presidential front-runner on Thursday during an annual news conference with reporters.

"He is a bright and talented person without any doubt," Putin said, adding that Trump is "an outstanding and talented personality."

And in remarks closely mirroring Trump's own assessment of the race, Putin also offered his assessment of the U.S. presidential campaign, calling Trump "the absolute leader of the presidential race," according to the Russian TASS news agency.

While most Republican presidential contenders have demonized the Russian president -- including calling him a "gangster" and a "thug" -- and pushed plans to isolate Russia on the world stage, Trump has instead touted his ability to improve U.S.-Russian relations by working with the autocratic Russian leader.

Trump has repeatedly touted his joint appearance with Putin on an episode of CBS's "60 Minutes" this fall, referring to himself and Putin as "stablemates."

Trump said in October that he and Putin "are very different" but suggested that he and Putin could move beyond the frigid relations that have come to define U.S.-Russia relations under President Barack Obama.

"I think that I would at the same time get along very well with him. He does not like Obama at all. He doesn't respect Obama at all. And I'm sure that Obama doesn't like him very much," Trump said then. "But I think that I would probably get along with him very well. And I don't think you'd be having the kind of problems that you're having right now."

Putin referenced Trump's reported desire "to reach another, deeper level of relations" with Russia.

"What else can we do but to welcome it? Certainly, we welcome it," Putin said.

http://www.cnn.com/2015/12/17/politics/r...d=19665561

You goddamn communist heathen, you had best sound off that you love the Virgin Mary... or I'm gonna stomp your guts out!
2015 Dec 17 17:09
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Blackthorne
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Post: #82
RE: Trump the Disrupter
'Europe’s far right can’t decide whether to love Donald Trump or loathe him'

The unrelenting rise of Donald Trump's electoral ambitions (see Tuesday's poll numbers for evidence) has led many observers to look outside the United States' borders for an explanation for what seems to them to a confounding political story. For many, the closest political kin for Trump is in the modern far right parties of Europe and their populist, anti-immigration policies.

It's a persuasive and obvious comparison. What's surprising, however, is that some of these far right parties seem just as confounded by Trump's proposals as anyone else.

Marine Le Pen, for example, has become a poster child for the modern European far right after leading the French National Front to unprecedented success over the past few years. Many see her as the most obvious European counterpart for Trump. And yet, despite their perceived kinship, Le Pen has personally criticized Trump's proposal to ban almost all Muslims from entering the United States.

"Seriously, have you ever heard me say something like that?" Le Pen said during one television interview, according to the New York Times. "I defend all the French people in France, regardless of their origin, regardless of their religion."

In Scandinavia, powerful far right parties who strongly oppose immigration have also come in opposition to Trump's policies. “It is just stupid. He says the most crazy things, but this must be one of the craziest things he’s ever come out with,” Søren Espersen, a foreign affairs spokesperson for the Danish People's Party, told an interviewer last week, also adding that Trump's rise was "becoming quite concerning."

"If Donald Trump won… I don’t think he will, I hope he doesn’t," Sweden Democrats leader Jimmie Akesson told Breitbart "He is very good at making speeches, but as a politician and a world leader? No, I don’t think that’s a very good idea.”

Nigel Farage, the leader of the anti-immigration U.K. Independence Party (Ukip), has also come to distance himself from Trump. “I think with this comment he’s gone too far," Farage said last week of Trump's proposed Muslim ban, adding that "what you would be doing is punishing a lot of very good people because of the actions of a few."

Even some supporters of Germany's Pegida movement, a group that organizes protests against what it calls the "Islamization" of Germany, have suggested they want to take a different approach to Trump. “We don't want to ‘make Germany big and great.’ That's too aggressive,” protester Dieter Tartz told Public Radio International. “We only want to preserve Germany and to keep it the way it is.”

This doesn't mean that no-one in the far right in Europe approves of Trump's approach, of course. This week, Matteo Salvini, leader of the far-right Northern League party in Italy, described the American billionaire's approach as "heroic" and said that he would like to shake his hand. Geert Wilders, a prominent Dutch politician known for his plainly anti-Islam message, has endorsed Trump on Twitter. Some fringe far right parties in Britain have expressed support for Trump's message. And, as my colleague Ishaan Tharoor has noted previously, there is some significant overlap in the support of Trump and the support of the most obviously neo-fascist of the larger European far right parties, Greece's Golden Dawn.

Instead, the diversity of opinions about Trump among European far right wingers reflects an under-acknowledged diversity among the continent's far right parties. These parties may all be driven by the same core grievances, but they are also shaped by other local factors and systems. A relatively mainstream party like Ukip would no doubt balk at the idea they would be lumped in with Golden Dawn, for example (and perhaps vice versa).

The more subtle anti-immigration stance taken by a seasoned European far right leader like Le Pen can partly be explained by local factors. First, it's simply unrealistic to pursue policies that openly target France's Muslim population, which is proportionally far larger than the small Muslim population in the United States (in fact, Le Pen has actively tried to court Muslim voters and had some success). Second, France's two-round voting system disincentivizes her from taking openly extreme policy positions, even if her base supports them. The National Front's poor showing in France's regional elections is evidence of how Le Pen's extreme reputation ultimately hurts her in elections.

Likewise, Trump's support may well be motivated by largely the same grievances as Le Pen's, but he is ultimately a product of the modern U.S. political system – a system which allows money to play an unusually prominent role and has election cycles that take eons compared to most democracies. Perhaps this is why Trump has become, as political scientist Cas Mudde has put it, an "anti-establishment elitist" whose best counterpart in Europe might be former Italian prime minister Silvio Berlusconi.

For now, Trump's far right peers in Europe seem to be watching his rise with a mixture of surprise and bewilderment – and perhaps more than a little jealousy.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/worl...oathe-him/

You goddamn communist heathen, you had best sound off that you love the Virgin Mary... or I'm gonna stomp your guts out!
2015 Dec 18 04:09
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Post: #83
RE: Trump the Disrupter
'Trump To Saudi Prince: Your Days Of Buying Off American Politicians Will Be Over If I Am Elected President'

2016 GOP Presidential frontrunner Donald Trump issued a strong rebuke to a Saudi Arabian Prince this weekend, saying the days of the Saudi Royal Family buying off America’s politicians will end if he is elected President.

According to The Hill:

Republican presidential front-runner Donald Trump is returning fire against the Saudi prince who told him to drop out of the White House race.

Trump called billionaire Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal “dopey” and accused him of trying to buy U.S. politicians with “daddy’s money” in a tweet late Friday.

“Dopey Prince @Alwaleed_Talal wants to control our U.S. politicians with daddy’s money. Can’t do it when I get elected,” Republican presidential front-runner Donald J. Trump tweeted after the prince told him to end his White House bid.

Earlier Friday, Bin Talal called Trump a “disgrace” and told him to end his White House bid.
“[Donald Trump], you are a disgrace not only to the GOP but to all America,” the Saudi billionaire tweeted. “Withdraw from the U.S. presidential race as you will never win.””

Read more at http://conservativeintel.com/2015/12/13/...president/

You goddamn communist heathen, you had best sound off that you love the Virgin Mary... or I'm gonna stomp your guts out!
2015 Dec 18 04:15
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Tintagell
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Post: #84
RE: Trump the Disrupter
(2015 Dec 18 04:09)Blackthorne Wrote:  'Europe’s far right can’t decide whether to love Donald Trump or loathe him'

The unrelenting rise of Donald Trump's electoral ambitions (see Tuesday's poll numbers for evidence) has led many observers to look outside the United States' borders for an explanation for what seems to them to a confounding political story. For many, the closest political kin for Trump is in the modern far right parties of Europe and their populist, anti-immigration policies.

It's a persuasive and obvious comparison. What's surprising, however, is that some of these far right parties seem just as confounded by Trump's proposals as anyone else.

Marine Le Pen, for example, has become a poster child for the modern European far right after leading the French National Front to unprecedented success over the past few years. Many see her as the most obvious European counterpart for Trump. And yet, despite their perceived kinship, Le Pen has personally criticized Trump's proposal to ban almost all Muslims from entering the United States.

"Seriously, have you ever heard me say something like that?" Le Pen said during one television interview, according to the New York Times. "I defend all the French people in France, regardless of their origin, regardless of their religion."

In Scandinavia, powerful far right parties who strongly oppose immigration have also come in opposition to Trump's policies. “It is just stupid. He says the most crazy things, but this must be one of the craziest things he’s ever come out with,” Søren Espersen, a foreign affairs spokesperson for the Danish People's Party, told an interviewer last week, also adding that Trump's rise was "becoming quite concerning."

"If Donald Trump won… I don’t think he will, I hope he doesn’t," Sweden Democrats leader Jimmie Akesson told Breitbart "He is very good at making speeches, but as a politician and a world leader? No, I don’t think that’s a very good idea.”

Nigel Farage, the leader of the anti-immigration U.K. Independence Party (Ukip), has also come to distance himself from Trump. “I think with this comment he’s gone too far," Farage said last week of Trump's proposed Muslim ban, adding that "what you would be doing is punishing a lot of very good people because of the actions of a few."

Even some supporters of Germany's Pegida movement, a group that organizes protests against what it calls the "Islamization" of Germany, have suggested they want to take a different approach to Trump. “We don't want to ‘make Germany big and great.’ That's too aggressive,” protester Dieter Tartz told Public Radio International. “We only want to preserve Germany and to keep it the way it is.”

This doesn't mean that no-one in the far right in Europe approves of Trump's approach, of course. This week, Matteo Salvini, leader of the far-right Northern League party in Italy, described the American billionaire's approach as "heroic" and said that he would like to shake his hand. Geert Wilders, a prominent Dutch politician known for his plainly anti-Islam message, has endorsed Trump on Twitter. Some fringe far right parties in Britain have expressed support for Trump's message. And, as my colleague Ishaan Tharoor has noted previously, there is some significant overlap in the support of Trump and the support of the most obviously neo-fascist of the larger European far right parties, Greece's Golden Dawn.

Instead, the diversity of opinions about Trump among European far right wingers reflects an under-acknowledged diversity among the continent's far right parties. These parties may all be driven by the same core grievances, but they are also shaped by other local factors and systems. A relatively mainstream party like Ukip would no doubt balk at the idea they would be lumped in with Golden Dawn, for example (and perhaps vice versa).

The more subtle anti-immigration stance taken by a seasoned European far right leader like Le Pen can partly be explained by local factors. First, it's simply unrealistic to pursue policies that openly target France's Muslim population, which is proportionally far larger than the small Muslim population in the United States (in fact, Le Pen has actively tried to court Muslim voters and had some success). Second, France's two-round voting system disincentivizes her from taking openly extreme policy positions, even if her base supports them. The National Front's poor showing in France's regional elections is evidence of how Le Pen's extreme reputation ultimately hurts her in elections.

Likewise, Trump's support may well be motivated by largely the same grievances as Le Pen's, but he is ultimately a product of the modern U.S. political system – a system which allows money to play an unusually prominent role and has election cycles that take eons compared to most democracies. Perhaps this is why Trump has become, as political scientist Cas Mudde has put it, an "anti-establishment elitist" whose best counterpart in Europe might be former Italian prime minister Silvio Berlusconi.

For now, Trump's far right peers in Europe seem to be watching his rise with a mixture of surprise and bewilderment – and perhaps more than a little jealousy.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/worl...oathe-him/

Trying to get that leftist cred, I see.
2015 Dec 18 06:27
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Blackthorne
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Post: #85
RE: Trump the Disrupter
(2015 Dec 18 06:27)Tintagell Wrote:  Trying to get that leftist cred, I see.

No young padawan; this is how the Europeans are reacting to the Teflon Don rather than the other way around; thus far The Donald has only mentioned one world leader that he'd like to have a pow-wow with: Putin. Otherwise he's made fun of, ridiculed, etc. the leaders of Europe like Merkel et al. LOL

You goddamn communist heathen, you had best sound off that you love the Virgin Mary... or I'm gonna stomp your guts out!
2015 Dec 18 07:38
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Post: #86
RE: Trump the Disrupter
[Image: 920x920.jpg]

You goddamn communist heathen, you had best sound off that you love the Virgin Mary... or I'm gonna stomp your guts out!
2015 Dec 18 08:35
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Mustapaita
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Post: #87
RE: Trump the Disrupter
Trump has as much credibility as a used car salesman. But how is cucking for Muslims'/liberal feels gonna help European anti-immigrationists? Why comment on Trump at all?

"Devil, I am devil." ― Pekka Siitoin
2015 Dec 18 08:48
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Alfaro
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Post: #88
RE: Trump the Disrupter
(2015 Dec 18 08:48)Mustapaita Wrote:  Trump has as much credibility as a used car salesman. But how is cucking for Muslims'/liberal feels gonna help European anti-immigrationists? Why comment on Trump at all?

Because if he wins, it will be a major hit on the dominant ideology of progresiveness worldwide, just imagine a president Trump, and all of those cuckservative European politicians who loathe him having to, all of a sudden, suck up to him and put up with his ways.


Trump replies to Putin's praises.



working on this...
2015 Dec 18 15:48
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Post: #89
RE: Trump the Disrupter
(2015 Dec 18 08:48)Mustapaita Wrote:  Trump has as much credibility as a used car salesman.

- Which already gives him an immense advantage over the average politician! thumbs up

Like Alfaro, I also agree that a major shift is needed, and perhaps this HAS to begin in the USA, given its immense impact on European affairs. Perhaps the Finns and Magyars can wriggle out of the shit we're in without this, maybe the French, but I doubt anything meaningful can happen in England without such a change in America.

"And now if a whole nation fell into that? In such a case, I answer, infallibly they will return out of it. For life is no cunningly-devised deception or self deception, it is a great truth that thou art alive, that thou hast desires, necessities: neither can these subsist and satisfy themselves on delusions, but on fact. To fact, depend on it, we shall come back: to such fact, blessed or cursed, as we have wisdom for."
Thomas Carlyle
2015 Dec 18 16:54
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Post: #90
RE: Trump the Disrupter
I just don't think Trump is the messiah of wpww.

"Devil, I am devil." ― Pekka Siitoin
2015 Dec 18 18:11
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