British EU referendum
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Phlegethon
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Post: #41
RE: British EU referendum
Only that Le Pen does not win in France, the AfD is nowhere near leading anything any way and Russian 'intrigues' are the least of our problems while millions of Maghrebine and Levantinic hordes of savages devastate our lands like a plague of locusts.


Not in haunts of marble chill,
Temples drear where ancients trod,—
Nay, in oaks on woody hill
Lives and moves the German God.

2016 May 14 23:52
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Godyfa (15-05-2016)
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Post: #42
RE: British EU referendum
The EU is not responsive to democracy anyway. Look at how they're treating Poland and Hungary. The most powerful men in the EU are appointed, not elected, so they'll still be there even if Le Pen and the AfD somehow sweep to power.
2016 May 15 13:02
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Artturi (15-05-2016)
Phlegethon
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Post: #43
RE: British EU referendum
Should France and Germany stop paying the EU budget the whole thing will sink quicker than a lead duck, though.


Not in haunts of marble chill,
Temples drear where ancients trod,—
Nay, in oaks on woody hill
Lives and moves the German God.

2016 May 16 00:01
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Artturi (16-05-2016)
Godyfa
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Post: #44
RE: British EU referendum
Quote:Why Britain really joined the EU and should now vote to leave it

Students and journalists often seem to believe that Britain had to join the EEC (later the EU) because geopolitical realities demanded this or economic decline forced it on us.

Nonsense. Ditching our victorious Commonwealth wartime allies to join a combination of Luxembourg, Belgium, the Netherlands, Italy, (Nato occupied) West Germany and a France that had just lost two vicious colonial wars in Vietnam and Algeria, and had only been saved from civil war by a constitutional coup by de Gaulle, made no sense at all geopolitically. These states were a bunch of losers who carried no weight internationally.

Likewise, although we certainly had economic problems, they were not of the kind that EEC membership could help. They concerned high overseas defence spending, militant trades unions and high taxation. All of these were later sorted out by UK government action alone.

read more http://www.cityam.com/240870/why-britain...o-leave-it
2016 May 16 17:44
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Osweo
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Post: #45
RE: British EU referendum
(2016 May 16 17:44)Godyfa Wrote:  read more http://www.cityam.com/240870/why-britain...o-leave-it

Interesting, and the most pertinent point deserves quoting:

Quote:We joined because the Tory party was captured by Macmillan, a long-standing European federalist. He worked hand in glove with Jean Monnet to get us in but was thwarted by de Gaulle, who could not see any rational reason why Britain should apply for membership save to please the USA.

As soon as Macmillan had made his bid, however, his cabinet’s Long Term Policies Committee was planning the establishment of a federal Europe and forecasting (in 1961!) that, by 2000, the UK would no longer exist as an independent state. Indeed, the British ambassador to France, Gladwyn Jebb, wrote elatedly to Downing Street that Britain would have less autonomy in a federal Europe than Texas had in the USA.

Once Edward Heath took over, he had Douglas Hurd arrange for the Tory Party to become a secret corporate member of Monnet’s Action Committee for the United States of Europe. The Labour and Liberal Parties followed suit. They believed, as Michael Heseltine later put it in the Spectator, that in future the name Britain should be no more meaningful than the name Mercia.


I wish they had more to say on the motivations of these traitors. There's a hint of doing what the USA wanted done, but there must be more to it than that. If it were fully spelt out, the typical reader would probably get far angrier than he already is!

"And now if a whole nation fell into that? In such a case, I answer, infallibly they will return out of it. For life is no cunningly-devised deception or self deception, it is a great truth that thou art alive, that thou hast desires, necessities: neither can these subsist and satisfy themselves on delusions, but on fact. To fact, depend on it, we shall come back: to such fact, blessed or cursed, as we have wisdom for."
Thomas Carlyle
2016 May 16 19:42
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Aptrgangr
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Post: #46
RE: British EU referendum
The 1975 EEC vote was just about trade.....not
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_Kin...ndum,_1975

once again you should have listened to Enoch Powell






How The British Media Lied And Tricked Us Into Joining The EU
http://www.vernoncoleman.com/howthebritishmedia.htm

This page contains the text of the Government produce pamphlet advocating a vote to stay in the "European Community (Common Market)" in the 1975 British Referendum on continuing British membership.
http://www.harvard-digital.co.uk/euro/pamphlet.htm

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2016 May 20 11:05
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Phlegethon
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Post: #47
RE: British EU referendum
Enoch, then an Ulster Unionist MP, recommended to vote Labour. That wasn't such a smart move and massively contributed to his relatively quick political marginalization.


Not in haunts of marble chill,
Temples drear where ancients trod,—
Nay, in oaks on woody hill
Lives and moves the German God.

2016 May 20 11:34
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Godyfa
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Post: #48
RE: British EU referendum
Brexit will not be a disorderly event.

Quote:Leaving the EU will change almost nothing – to start with

There is, however, a much simpler way of looking at this.

Let’s start with the question: What will a British Conservative government actually do if presented with a Leave vote? Because several things are certain but rarely said:

  1. The UK will still have a Conservative government with a small majority on 24th June.
  2. The parliamentary Conservative Party will have been badly bloodied by the referendum campaign and, regardless of the result, will once again want to turn its collective mind to uniting against what it sees as The Corbyn Terror.
  3. Over half the Conservative MPs and most of the Cabinet will have voted “the wrong way” – not the profile of a governing party about to seek a total cut-off from the EU.
  4. This is even more true for Westminster in general, where MPs are overwhelmingly in favour of Remain. They will be voting on any proposed deal that answers the Leave vote.
    • So simple parliamentary arithmetic topped by a Conservative impulse to reunify can only mean a pragmatic and de-risked exit path. This remains true even if a senior Leaver, even Michael Gove, takes over from David Cameron. The civil service will also be pushing a pragmatic line.

      Against a backdrop of gyrating markets and with very constrained timescales, the Government would conclude the most optimal way of de-risking Brexit would be to take up a European Economic Area position, which would mean re-joining the European Free Trade Association (EFTA). Indeed, this may be the only basis upon which the EU will deal.

      Such a deal would signal an end to scare stories of being cut off from the Single Market, and alleviate worries around Irish borders, Scottish independence, involvement in Science and Education programmes and notably, the concerns of British Expats and their rights.

      It is not difficult, indeed it is remarkably easy, to imagine a semi-Remain/semi-Leave Conservative Party getting behind such a deal, allowing them to present a strong and united front against Labour in time for the 2020 general election.
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2016/05/...um=twitter
2016 May 20 17:20
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Flavius
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Post: #49
RE: British EU referendum
(2016 May 20 17:20)Godyfa Wrote:  Brexit will not be a disorderly event.

Quote:Leaving the EU will change almost nothing – to start with

There is, however, a much simpler way of looking at this.

Let’s start with the question: What will a British Conservative government actually do if presented with a Leave vote? Because several things are certain but rarely said:

  1. The UK will still have a Conservative government with a small majority on 24th June.
  2. The parliamentary Conservative Party will have been badly bloodied by the referendum campaign and, regardless of the result, will once again want to turn its collective mind to uniting against what it sees as The Corbyn Terror.
  3. Over half the Conservative MPs and most of the Cabinet will have voted “the wrong way” – not the profile of a governing party about to seek a total cut-off from the EU.
  4. This is even more true for Westminster in general, where MPs are overwhelmingly in favour of Remain. They will be voting on any proposed deal that answers the Leave vote.
    • So simple parliamentary arithmetic topped by a Conservative impulse to reunify can only mean a pragmatic and de-risked exit path. This remains true even if a senior Leaver, even Michael Gove, takes over from David Cameron. The civil service will also be pushing a pragmatic line.

      Against a backdrop of gyrating markets and with very constrained timescales, the Government would conclude the most optimal way of de-risking Brexit would be to take up a European Economic Area position, which would mean re-joining the European Free Trade Association (EFTA). Indeed, this may be the only basis upon which the EU will deal.

      Such a deal would signal an end to scare stories of being cut off from the Single Market, and alleviate worries around Irish borders, Scottish independence, involvement in Science and Education programmes and notably, the concerns of British Expats and their rights.

      It is not difficult, indeed it is remarkably easy, to imagine a semi-Remain/semi-Leave Conservative Party getting behind such a deal, allowing them to present a strong and united front against Labour in time for the 2020 general election.
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2016/05/...um=twitter

I can't wait for the UK to leave. The EU will be better off without Cameron or the Labour commies. Farage will be out of a job, however... The UK will be massively weakened in the process. The British fear of a continental superpower a la Napoleon to the Third Reich will be realized in the shape of a neo-Charlemagne Empire aka European Union. Things shall go well as long FN and AfD take control of France and Germany (or at the very least, les Republicains and CDU become reliant on them as coalition major partners).
2016 May 20 19:44
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Flavius
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Post: #50
RE: British EU referendum
“Britain, under the exit scenario, would fare no better. It would be stranded in the middle of the Atlantic, unable to draw on the synergies of the European project. It would be left alone to deal with the ever-present threats of nationalism, populist politics, migration issues and ethnic intolerance. Closing its doors to workers from the EU, it would have to look for manpower, most likely less qualified and less adaptable, in other parts of the world.”

http://www.theguardian.com/politics/2016...stay-in-eu
2016 May 21 02:45
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